Monday, July 18, 2011

Illegal Indian immigrants increasingly sneaking across Texas-Mexico border

Many immigrants are financially well off seeking better life in the U.S.
The typical illegal immigrant crossing over the Texas border it shares with Mexico these days comes from far, far away. Illegal immigrants that cross into the U.S. with assistance from the Mexican drug cartels are increasingly coming from India. These unlawful immigrants, unlike the Mexican field worker coming to the states to seek work, are from financially stable cities in India that hope to make even more money in the U.S. Many of these Indian immigrants can pay up to $20,000 to cross into America.

Once inside the U.S., many Indian illegals fan out across the country, often relying on relatives who are already here to arrange jobs and housing.
Once inside the U.S., many Indian illegals fan out across the country, often relying on relatives who are already here to arrange jobs and housing.
LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online) - Fewer Mexicans and Central Americans are crossing the U.S. border due to the downturn in the local economy, and human smugglers are eager for more "high-value cargo" like Indians.

"Being the businessmen they are, they need to start looking for ways to supplement that work," Rosendo Hinojosa, chief of the U.S. Border Patrol's Rio Grande Valley Sector says. The Rio Grande is the southernmost tip of Texas, and is the most active nationwide for apprehending Indian nationals.

Between October 2009 and March 2011, the Border Patrol detained at least 2,600 illegal immigrants from India, a dramatic rise over the typical 150 to 300 arrests per year. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told a Senate committee that at some point this year, Indians will account for about 1 in 3 non-Mexican illegal immigrants caught in Texas.

Once inside the U.S., many Indian illegals fan out across the country, often relying on relatives who are already here to arrange jobs and housing. Indians have flooded into Texas in part because U.S. authorities have cracked down on the traditional ways they used to come here, such as entering through airports with student or work visas. The tougher enforcement has made it harder for immigrants to use visas listing non-existent universities or phantom companies.

Another contributing factor to this uptick is that the nations of Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Honduras have sought to attract investors by allowing visitors from India to enter without visas. Mexico has since asked neighboring Guatemala to restore the visa requirement for Indians, which it did on June 6.

The nations of El Salvador, Nicaragua and Honduras still don't require visas for Indians, meaning smugglers can shift routes and use those countries as alternate jumping-off points for the journey north.

Indians caught by U.S. authorities often claim they fled their homeland because of religious persecution.

© 2011, Catholic Online. Distributed by NEWS CONSORTIUM

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